Running definitions

Let’s speak the same language. Browse these running definitions and see if you mean the same thing when you say them.

Long Run

Aerobic Pace Running

Aerobic training should be conversational. Meaning you should be able to easily hold a conversation while running this effort.

Type of Aerobic Training:

Easy Run: The easy run is 60-70% of your MHR (maximum heart rate). The pace is about 1:30-2:00m slower than your current 5k race pace. This type of mileage should be 70-80% of your weekly mileage. LSD running as it is often referred, is Long Steady Distance, not long slow distance.
Recovery Run: The recovery run is approximately 40-60% of your MHR. This pace is about 2:00m slower than you’re your current 5k pace. This run should be done the day following a race or heavy work-out. There should be little to no stress during this LIGT work-out.

Purpose:

Builds Mitochondria: Mitochondria is the energy producing cell. These power generators convert Oxygen and nutrients into energy.
This type of running builds the foundation. A strong foundation will help prevent injury and build the necessary strength for the harder faster training that follows.

Tempo Run

Tempo Pace Running

This type of training is often referred to as comfortably hard. It is not threshold training.

Tempo Training:

Tempo work-outs need to be run at the proper pace. You can find these paces by using the Daniel’s pace charts. If you do these runs too hard you run the risk of overtraining, if you run them too slow you are not accomplishing the fitness gains associated with this specific work-out.
This type of training is done at 70-80% of your MHR. This pace is about 45-75sec. above your current 5k pace.
Tempo pace can be run for as little as 5 minutes but should not be run for longer than 20 minutes in a single training session.
Tempo should be run once a week and should be approximately. 10% of your weekly mileage.
Develop this run in the early stages of your training after a good mileage base has been set.

Purpose:

The training at this pace helps avoid overtraining, yields more satisfying work-outs and leads to better consistency.
The physiological benefit of this type of running is to improve your lactate threshold. Lactate threshold is the point in your running where lactic acid begins to accumulate and your performance slows.

Threshold Run

Threshold Pace Running

This type of training is often referred to as hard. It is not tempo training.

Threshold Training:

Threshold work-outs need to be run at the proper pace. This type of training is done at 80-90% of your MHR. This pace is about 30sec. above your current 5k pace.
Tempo pace can be run for as little as 2 minutes (beginners)but should not be run for longer than 10 minutes (advanced) with short 1:30min. rest periods.
Threshold can be run once a week and should be approximately. 10% of your weekly mileage.
Develop this run in the middle stages of your training after a good mileage base and tempo regime has been set.

Purpose:

The training at this pace helps avoid overtraining, yields more satisfying work-outs and leads to better consistency.
The physiological benefit of this type of running is to improve your lactate threshold. Lactate threshold is the point in your running where lactic acid begins to accumulate and your performance slows.

Important:

Do not do tempo and threshold training in the same week, they are duplicating the same physiological change. Tempo runs are done earlier in the season and threshold runs are done from the middle of your training program and maintained at some level into your peak races. Progressive build up is imperative.

Interval or Repetition Run

Interval Pace Running

This type of training is often referred to as very hard. It is not threshold training.

Interval Training:

Intervals need to be run at the proper pace. This type of training is done at 90-98% of your MHR. This is race pace.
Interval pace can be run for as little as 20sec (beginners) but should not be run for longer than 5 minutes (advanced) with long 3:00-10:00min. or more rest periods.
Intervals can be run once a week and should be approximately. 10% of your weekly mileage.
Develop this run in the later stages of your training after a good mileage base and threshold regime has been set.

Purpose:

The purpose of Interval training is to develop your anaerobic system. Rep running develops a more efficient stride and amps your anaerobic metabolism.
The training helps increase race pace and decrease race times by letting you run more relaxed at faster paces.
The physiological benefit of this type of running is to improve your speed.

Important:

Work intervals into your mid season and be careful not run intervals within 3 days of a race.
Because you are running very fast, stress levels are high, cortisol levels are high. Rep training should compromise no more than 5% of your total weekly mileage and sufficient rest should follow.

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